Making a Linen Robe à l’Anglaise: the photos

Although I finished this dress back in January, I didn’t actually take worn photos of it until this Summer. I loved the idea of the dress and the fabric I picked, but in the end the fit of the bodice really disappointed me. It doesn’t quite fit right over my stays, it’s a big baggy in some places and wrinkles in others. One day, I’ll get an Anglaise that fits right!

So here is a video tutorial on how I made the hat, the breakdown of the undergarments, finished photos of the costume and at the end, some clips of the dress in action!

Here is the break down of the undergarments:

With the bum pad.
This is my ugly puffer à l’American Duchess! I really want to redo it soon as it’s not really big enough.
And finally with the petticoat!

Here are the blog posts about making the dress:

Making the bodice

Making the skirt, sleeves and fichu

And here is the final outfit!

Scandalous view of my petticoat.

If you made this far, amazing! I also took some clips while we were out, I really love seeing how the dress moves since I can’t see these angles myself.

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Making Aurora’s peasant dress: the photos

I loved making this costume. This was based on an illustration by Dylan Bonner. I wore it to MCM London in May 2018. I really love how it turned out! You can read about the making of it here:

Making Aurora’s peasant dress: the bodice and the vest

Making Aurora’s peasant dress: the skirt and details

All of the photos below are by the amazing Jamie Flack of Cat and Crown Photography.

Making an Early Edwardian ensemble: the photos

I finally remembered to post these! I took these just before the end of the 2017, as I wanted this to be my last costume of the year. The only day I could try to photograph it was on the 30th of December, which happened to be a cloud and very windy day! The flowers came off my hat at least four times and I was afraid I was going to loose it. Everything worked out in the end though! All in all, I definitely love this costume. Next steps would be a proper corset (this current one has some fit issues) and a corset cover (the blouse is quite sheer, and the corset was blue). All in all, though, I think it captures the look I was going for!

Making an Edwardian Corset

Making an Early Edwardian ensemble: the blouse

Making an Early Edwardian ensemble: the skirt and the hat

I’ve also got a Facebook album on my page with more photos and better quality (I had to compress them to upload here!). You can find them here!


 

Silly out take – it was so windy!

Featuring my Manhattan boots, by American Duchess!

Making an 1860s ballgown: the photos

It was such a pleasure to finally get all of the layers of this dress on and take some photos of it! It was absolutely freezing outside, but I think it was worth in the end. Although this project has been complete for some months, there are some slight improvements I’d like to make, mainly in terms of petticoat support. The current petticoat, I think, is ideal for a round cage scenario, rather than an elliptical shape. So the back side of the skirt has very little support and the train is very sad by itself. However that should be easily fixed by a better petticoat so keep an eye out for that!

Making an 1860s ballgown: plans and foundations

Making an 1860s ballgown: the bodice

Making an 1860s ballgown: the sleeves and skirt


 

Making a Jane Porter cosplay: the photos

So one of the things that happened in the past cons was that I only ever really got one or two shots of my costumes actually being worn, at the end of the day (also when I looked the worst because I’m still a con rookie and they WRECK ME). Not anymore my friends! I was so privileged this time to be joined by my friend Lachlan Williams (https://www.instagram.com/obscure.lachlan/?hl=en), an amazing photographer. I thank him so much for his patience with me, I’m a terrible model and he’d never done anything like this and I couldn’t keep my eyes open for more than one second so – I’m super impressed with the results! It was so hard to just pick a few to feature here, so if you’d like to see more, follow me on Instagram as that’s where I post most things!

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I’ve got several shots in B&W which also look amazing

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By the end of the con, my hair wouldn’t stay up no matter what. Guess cons are kinda like the jungle.

Making an 1871 Evening Dress: the photos

This dress was made based on an extant 1871 evening dress at the Fashion Museum Bath. There’s a picture of it in my first post. You can find the Making of posts herehere and here.

I really enjoyed the process of making this. It involved making a bustle cage, which was a first. I wore it over my Victorian corset, the bustle cage and two early bustle petticoats. The dress is made up of a bodice, a skirt and an overskirt. Like at the time, the bodice remains separate from the skirt. Since I have some leftover fabric, it might be nice to try an make a day bodice for this project at some point in the future! In the end, I had a lot of fun and I’m happy with a lot of the elements.

Thanks for reading!

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Making a Cream Dress: the Photos

This dress was a project on a whim. I was on holiday in Spain and I’d seen an awesome fabric shop but had no immediate projects. So I set out to the internet and found a photo of a costume in Reign that I used as inspiration. I wanted it to have that romanticised medieval look, so though it is historically inspired, it is in no way accurate. I am quite happy with it! It was very good practice on building bodices, drafting sleeves and general dressmaking skills. I also got to embellish it with beads and pearls, which I loved! You can find the posts about making it below. These photos are, like all of the others, taken by amazing friend and photographer, Raquel Gaspar. Also, this dress does have a sash to go with it, which I mentioned in the blog posts, and it annoys me so much that I forgot to take it to the shoot! It really completes the look (and hides some mathematical imperfections in seam making). But alas!

Making a Cream Dress: The Bodice

Making the Cream dress: sleeves, skirts and details

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Twirling to try and show off the skirt! Instead, it got covered in mud.

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Bloopers: very unladylike boots.