Making Hermione’s Yule Ball dress: the bodice

After re-reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire earlier this year, the idea of cosplaying Hermione’s Yule Ball dress came to mind. I had always thought it a beautiful dress, but never thought of cosplaying it because I just don’t really enjoy pink that much – and I thought a fully pink dress might be a bit overkill for me. However, upon reading the book, I was reminded that originally she was described as wearing periwinkle blue robes.

PROBLEM SOLVED.

My plans for MCM May had already been decided, but while I was out fabric shopping for those, I always kept an eye out for appropriate fabric. I think I’m just too picky with fabric, I ended up agonising over it for months. I hoarded up different shades and samples. I was conflicted about how dark it should be, did I want it more blue or lilac-y – just overthinking everything basically. I wanted it to come out perfectly.

Some of the fabric samples from my many shopping trips.

After going to the Warner Bros. studios in September (photos here!) I was absolutely decided to make it for MCM October. So here are some photos of the dress that I took while at the Studios:

I knew I would never be able to get it as perfect as this – I’m still fairly new to sewing and this was a very ambitious project. Nevertheless, I was very determined.

My first step was to sketch and plan out the whole dress as best as I could.

My sketch!
My plans! I swear they made sense… at some point.

Then I finally committed and went fabric shopping. I bought this beautiful satin at my local fabric shop. I bought four meters and it was around £8 p/m. I then bought around ten meters of chiffon, in three different shades. I wasn’t sure of how much I needed, but after doing some research online, it seemed that everyone that had made it had used a lot of chiffon, which made sense! My first shade was a light two-tone chiffon, blue and lilac. The second was a stronger blue, and the last a darker two-tone blue and purple.

It’s not quite periwinkle but it’s the closest I could get.
And the chiffons!

So it was on to pattern drafting. I actually had draped an original pattern and done a couple of mock-ups way back in February when I’d first thought about this project. It was really hard to come back to a pattern that I hadn’t touched for so long. The fit of this dress is super fiddly and so hard to achieve that I think I ended up making about six mock-ups before I called it a day with the pattern.

The bodice consists of a main triangle in the breast cup, and then two triangle-shaped layers over top. These seams were very tricky, but at least the amount of mock-ups helped me become comfortable with the construction of the bodice!

On the left is the first mock-up I made after picking up the pattern again. The right side is after some alterations and made of a more similar fabric to the satin I would be using.

Some mock-up progress!
The final mock-up! Each fitting only needed small alterations, like taking or adding a quarter inch here or there, and the changes were more noticeable on me than on my dressform.

Once I was somewhat satisfied (I will never be satisfied), I went ahead and cut out the pattern pieces from the lining and the outer fabric. I started my assembling my lining, as more of a… seventh practice run.

So the bodice consists of a main triangle, then followed by two… weird triangle strips over it. The top two layers united at the centre front. The layer immediately over the triangle unites with the main front bodice. Both of the top strips extend to meet the back panel at the side seams. The main bodice has a soft point both at the top and bottom at the centre front.

At this point, I sort of messed up the seam allowances which messed with the fitting of the lower cup in the main triangle. I noticed that the hard triangular seams were easier to sew with a small seam allowance, so I only added 1/4”, but for the main bodice pieces I added 1/2”. This resulted in some bagginess immediately beneath the cups, so that the bodice doesn’t hug the bodice like the original A lot of piecing together and ironing later, I had a semi-decent bodice!

Assembling the outer fabric. Some tips: small seam allowances, basting before sewing and snipping the seam allowances.

The inside seams of the bodice!

Then I pinned the lining around the neckline to the outer fabric, right sides together. I sewed and ironed that seam. Then I ironed the lining inwards, and tried out a technique called ‘sewing to the under’ (highly recommended by Hoppin Bobbin). This would help keep the lining in place.

Lining and outer fabric pinned together!

I basted the top half of the bodice together and then sewed it down.

I waited until the skirt was attached to add the zipper to the back and finish the lining, so instead let’s talk about sleeves!

The straps are just long strips of the satin fabric, rolled over twice and sewed down into straps.

The strips were cut on the bias.

Then I cut two circular flounces for the sleeves. I cut the circle open and trimmed off a bit from the front sections so that it would flow longer into the back. I overlocked all the edges. Then I sewed them to the straps by hand.

The lining was only finished after attaching the skirt so I’ll talk more about it on the next post!

Sneak peek of more chiffon flounces:

 

Making Angelica Schuyler’s dress: the sleeves and skirt

This is the last post about making Angelica Schuyler’s dress! The costume is now completed and I’ve ran into some hurdles. I think it all traces back to my initial issue, which I complained about in my first post. My fabric choice was terrible. Originally I wanted taffeta which I think would’ve solved my problems, but pressed for time and a decision, I hastily settled on some super cheap satin. The quality of this fabric is just non-existent. It crinkles, pulls and does not lie flat, even though I interfaced it and interlined it, it’s worn over a corset and is double boned at every seam – and it still misbehaves! I’m at the end of my wits and thinking of not wearing it to MCM London.

In the end, the sleeves and the skirt actually went really well, so that is why I’m still bothering writing this up. Hopefully someone will learn from my mistakes!


For the sleeves, I dug out my basic straight sleeve block and ‘Creating Historical Clothes’ by Elizabeth Friendship. I think I picked the late basic fitted 18th century sleeve and modified my pattern accordingly. I cut this out of the satin fabric and the lining fabric.

I decided I wasn’t going to add a cuff, so I finished the cuff edge by sewing the satin to the lining fabric, right sides together.

Then I ironed the seam open, flipped the sides so it was wrong side to wrong side, and ironed it in place.

This created a really nice, neat edge.

Then I basted the two layers together on all sides and marked and sewed the elbow dart.

Once that was done, I sewed up the side seam.

I decided to do a flat felled seam, so it covered the raw edge.

The sleeve cap has three small pleats so it fits nicely. I figured these out (quite randomly) and basted them down. Then I pinned the sleeve into the armhole and sewed it down.

This is the first time I sewed sleeve in by machine, but I wanted it to be super durable.

These raw seams were then covered when I sewed in the bodice lining. The last thing to add were some little chiffon flouffs like on the neckline. I made two rectangles, which I folded in half, basted and gathered.

Then I pinned them into the cuff and handsewed them down.

For the skirt, it was just a big big rectangle. I marked the center front and left a ten inch gap. Then I did three deep pleats at the side and smaller pleats at the back. I knew the original dress had big pleats at the side, but I’d never seen the back. Usually 18th century dresses have more volume at the back, so I made sure to make more pleats there.

The pleats were marked and basted down, then sewed in place by machine.

Then I sewed up the back seam with a french seam, leaving a 7” gap at the top. I turned these edges inwards twice and sewed them down.

At this point, I tried it on over the bum pad. It looked okay!

The next step was to cut out the waistband. It’s just a large rectangle, the waist measurement by the doubled desired height of the waistband (it’s then ironed in half).

I pinned the waistband in place and sewed it down. Then I flipped over to the wrong side and handsewed that down.

I added a hook and bar to the top to close the waistband.

Then it was time for hemming! I cut off the excess (which was like 14” in the end). Then I sewed on horsehair tape to the right side of the hem, then flipped it over to the wrong side and sewed it down by hand with a herringbone stitch.

And it was done! The skirt actually turned out fine. I hope I can somehow fix the bodice, maybe by adding more boning or something. I’m going to try! I’d really like to wear this in the end.

UPDATE: I’m posting this so long after writing it but! I added extra boning channels at the front of the bodice and it helped with some of the wrinkles. I was happy enough to wear it to Comic Con. I didn’t get any proper photos of it, but I did get one or two phone snapshots so here is one!

Making Angelica Schuyler’s dress: the bodice

As soon as London MCM April was over, I started looking towards October. Unfortunately I postponed making decisions for a while and wasted a lot of time fabric browsing and shopping. However, after listening to the Hamilton musical so often, I decided I wanted to make a dress from the show. Not only do I love the musical, the songs and the characters, but the 18th century inspired costumes also made me really excited.

I ran into some problems pretty quickly. I have never actually seen the show (though it’s set to open in London in November and I’ve got tickets for next year YEEEES), and I could only find two HQ photos of Angelica’s costume to go off of.

Both found in this wonderful blog post!

This was a struggle. First with fabric picking. I read somewhere that silk taffeta was used for their costumes, so that helped with fabric choice, but from these two photos, I wasn’t sure about the colour to pick as I think the stage lights have quite the influence on the colour in these photos.

I was a bit averse to pink, so I wanted to keep it closer to a peach/coral tone. However, I could find no nice taffetas in these colours. I ranted a bit about fabric shopping in my fabric haul. Essential I checked every shop that I could and online too.

Eventually I settled for a cheap satin I found in one of the shops at Walthamstow Market. I regret this fabric decision. Though the colour is nice (though much brighter out of the dark shop), the satin is of very poor quality and anything snags it and it kept rumpling and not ironing properly. But oh well! It was £2 p/m, what did I expect.

So here are the fabrics that I am using for this project: 5 meters of coral/peach satin that was £2 p/m, a meter of textured cream chiffon was that £4 p/m and one meter of matching lining that was £3 p/m.

Once that was settled, I started thinking about silhouette. From the photos that I research, I could see that there was still a distinct 18th century silhouette in her costume. I knew what this meant! I’d been meaning to make new late 18th century stays for a while, so this was the perfect opportunity. I have a blog post about them here.

I also picked up the bum pad I had already made from the American Duchess Simplicity pattern. I had made this just because, way back, and though I think it’s meant to be earlier 18th century, I really liked how it matched Angelica’s silhouette in the musical.

I decided to only go for one petticoat for comfort and picked up a simple rectangle one I already had.

Now onto the bodice! I decided to use the block I had made for the stays. I drew the outline of the stays on the block and then changed some of the lines to what would hopefully match Angelica’s design lines. I thought this would be easier than draping and would ensure I kept the conical-like shape and that it would fit nicely over the stays.

Once the pattern was done, I made my first mock up. It needed some adjustments around the armhole and the back taken in, but thankfully there wasn’t too much to change.

So I moved on to cutting the pattern pieces out of cotton drill (for interlining), the lining fabric and the outer fabric. I added a half an inch seam allowance to all pattern pieces, and then trimmed back the cotton drill seam allowance to a quarter inch, to try and keep the seams and edges less bulky.

Cutting out the interlining out of cotton drill.
And the lining.
Trimming the seam allowance on the interlining layer.

Since the satin is so cheap and flimsy, I decided to interface the satin in an attempt to make it stiffer.

I cut out the interfacing using the trimmed interlining layer (so that the interfacing wouldn’t bulk up seams either).

This went pretty bad the first time. I struggled to get the right temperature on my iron and I was rushing through it, so the stain wrinkled in some places.

Pre-wrinkling.

I took a deep breathe and carefully tore the interfacing away. The satin was okay except for some drops of glue that remained attached to the wrong side of the satin. But since I was going to try to interface it again, it didn’t matter to me.

So I tried a second time, kept my patience, and it worked out nicely. (One day I will actually find affordable woven fusible interfacing instead of the crappy paper-like one I have).

I flatlined the cotton drill to the outer fabric by basting with large machine stitches around all the edges.

Then I assemble the bodice by sewing up the side seams, front seam and shoulder seam.

I ironed all the seams flat, and basted them down to create boning chanels.

The boning is only meant to support the bodice so that it stays in shape and straight, so I used lightweight synthetic whalebone.

The edges can be filled down so they’re smooth and round!

Then I went around and turned all the edges inwards. I only turned them inwards once to finish the edge, as the lining would be covering the raw edges of the fabric. I sewed all of these down by hand.

Also the center front has some ugly crinkling that happened when I first ironed this seam and it won’t go away (cries).
The finished bottom edge! The lining will cover all the ugly basting stitches.

I also added some boning to the curve neckline as I thought this would help keep it crisp.

Before attaching the lining, I went ahead and made the ruffle details, so that the lining would also cover the ruffles’ raw edges. I measured around the neckline and the gap at the front and multiplied it by 2.3. Then I cut two long rectangles and one square (due to fabric width limitations, otherwise I would’ve just cut it an odd and large T-shape). I seamed the two rectangles to the square and then folded the edges down.

The folded edge at the top would be the top of the ruffle. I ironed everything into place and basted the raw edges together. Then I sewed gathering stitches (longest stitch on my machine and high tension helped to gather it as I went). I also sewed a row of gathering stitches on the bottom of the square. Then I gathered everything down to the required measurements.

I noticed that where there was only one layer of chiffon, so the square, it was too see-through so I cut out a square out of plain cotton which I hand basted to the gathered square. This made it more opaque so that the stays wouldn’t be visible through the chiffon. I pinned this weird T-shaped ruffle to the neckline and then handsewed it down with a large backstitch, making sure the stitches didn’t come through to the right side of the bodice.

Meanwhile I made and inserted the sleeves, but I will talk about the sleeves on the next post. They were set in before sewing the line, so that the lining would also cover the armhole seam.

I assembled all the seams on the lining, turned the edges inwards and pinned it to the bodice. This way, I would sew the lining down and finish the lining edges at the same time. I know there’s a wonderful 18th century stitch where you finish all edges at the same time, but I only remembered it after I’d already turned the outer fabric edges inwards. I sewed down the lining with small running stitches.

The lining!
Pinned in place!

The only thing left to do was add some eyelets! Since this is a cosplay piece, technically, and not historical, I decided to add metal eyelets. This is much quicker and I didn’t mind the look of them. I marked the placement with pencil, leaving a one inch and half gap in between each eyelet. Then I used my small scissors to make a small hole and used my pliers to set in the eyelets.

And done! I’m quite happy with it, even if the bodice wrinkled in some ugly ways. I hope the end result will look okay and the fabric will stop battling me.

Visiting the Warner Brothers Studios London: costume photos

Two weeks ago, I managed to finally make it back to the Warner Brothers Studios in London. For those that might not know, the Warner Brothers Studios was where a lot of the Harry Potter films were filmed and a few years back, they opened part of the studios as an exhibit about the films. They have loads of bits of sets, props and costumes on display, plus lots of information about the behind-the-scenes work that went into the films. I went for the first time around the time it opened, so they had added the Forbidden Forest and the Hogwarts Express exhibit since I’d been.

I don’t usually post about personal things on this blog, but they had a special Wizarding Wardrobe exhibit on and I took a lot of photos of the costumes on display. I’m currently planning on making Hermione’s Yule Ball dress (in blue), so this was like a research trip! Anyway, I thought that the photos of the costumes might help other people that are planning on making costumes from the films.

 

 

I took a lot of photos of this dress.

Yes this is actually left over fabric from Hermione’s Yule Ball dress! The staff at the studio were so helpful and when they heard I was going to try to make it, they pointed this out to me. I was over the moon.

Really wanna cosplay Dumbledore one day >_>

 

Some of Rita Skeeter’s costumes were on display for the first time.

They had a dressform with half the pattern of the Beauxbaton uniform and the mock up on the other half! So interesting.

Some of Luna’s accessories.

They had a lot of Lockhart’s costumes out and they were gorgeous to look at.

Tonks!

 

Making 1776 stays

So one of the things I really enjoy about period costume is the undergarments. They were where I started with period costume, and it’s the first stop when thinking about a new project. When I first got into sewing, the first two things I made were stays using Norah Waugh’s Corsets and Crinolines. The first was 1630s stays, and the second were 1776 stays. Although I had a pair that I could wear, it was really just practice – I didn’t have the correct materials, I didn’t even bother to sew straps.

Here’s an old photo of them from my Instagram.

I’ve also made some 18th century stays using the Outlander inspired Simplicity pattern by American Duchess. I really like them, but they have a different shape which I think resembles more the first half of the 18th century, while I need the conical shape of later on for the project I’m planning.

My other 18th century stays.

So with new things in mind, I drafted my own pattern for the 1776 stays using this book:

The pattern only has two pieces (and a strap) and it looked like this:

After the pattern was done, I did one mock-up just to make sure that the fit was about right. The mock-up seemed to fit fine, so I went ahead and cut it out of a heavy cotton drill.

The strap.

After I had all the pieces cut out, I went about transferring the boning channels to the drill. I used several different methods, but mostly measuring and positioning the pattern over it and marking it. I also used tailor’s tacking. It’s important that they’re symmetric, so I really took my time with this.

I then stared at the front panels and realised I hadn’t added horizontal bones. Horizontal bones held with the shape and also add support to the bust. My bust didn’t really need extra support but I did want a challenge, so I decided to add the two horizontal bones that are also in the Norah Waugh pattern. This would provide sewing headaches further on.

After all the bones were transferred onto the panels, I cut out the panels from the outter fabric. I bought a meter of this lovely old Liberty cotton.

The outer panels.

I’ve had trouble before with flatlining bodices by machine as my machine doesn’t have one of those extended tables so the fabric shifts a lot. Since I loved this fabric and wanted everything to go as right as possible, I decided to hand baste the layers together. So I positioned the cotton drill onto the flower cotton, right sides out (the cotton drill right side is actually the one with the boning markings so you know where to sew).

The effort was worth it in the end I think.

Then it was time to sew the boning channels! This is really tricky and tedious, so my only recommendation is to take your time. I went so slow with these and I still made some mistakes, especially at the little crossroads with the horizontal bones.

I backstitched as I reached an intersection, lifted the needle and shifted down over the channel. Then I backstitched again and continued sewing that channel. This leaves little bundles of thread like this:

Which I then clipped away. If you have enough thread, the best way it to pull both tails to the back and neatly knot them.

For the back panels, I had added a 1” seam allowance at the back, so that I could turn it inwards. This would help support the eyelets. So I turned it inwards and basted it down, and only then I remarked the edge boning channels and sewed them.

This concluded all the boning channels! I went around and knotted all the threads I could and trimmed the rest. Then it was time to do up the seams. Super easy, since there were only three seams.

Then I measured and cut the pieces of synthetic whalebone. I’ve used flat steel boning, plastic boning, and cable ties before. For this, I decided to try synthetic whalebone. I think it’s my favourite so far! It’s light and flexible like the cable ties, but it’s stiffer and provides more support. I also find it more comfortable and cheaper than flat steel boning.

I filed down the sharp edges until they were nice and round and slotted them into position. I used my clips to keep some of them in place, and then went around to the binding.

For the binding, I got it into my head that I really wanted to use leather. I know it’s historically appropriate, there are many extant stays with this sort of binding, plus it would be something new and different. My initial plan was to find soft leather, like suede, that matched the colour of the contrasting thread I’d sewn the boning channels with. THIS PROVED IMPOSSIBLE (unless I was willing to sell my soul for a huge piece of leather).

I took to Goldhawk Road and thankfully found a really nice scrap of soft, brown leather that cost me £10. I was hoping it would be enough, but as it turned out, I didn’t even use up half of it, so it was an excellent buy!

To make the binding, I took my trusty ruler and marked 1” wide strips across the widest direction of the leather. This was my first time working with leather, so forgive any mistakes!

After that, I cut the strips. Because leather doesn’t fray, I didn’t have to sew the strips together. I only needed to overlap the ends when I ran out, which was great. I got a sturdy needle (which bent halfway through binding the stays!) and my thimble. I’m usually terrible at using a thimble just because I haven’t bothered to adapt to use one, but for this, it was my best friend.

Another tip, pinning this was impossible, but little clips worked wonderfully. I use them to secure the binding to the stays. I started on the bottom first, because I wanted to get it over with. I used SO MANY clips that I could only pin small sections at a time because I ran out of clips, but it really help to speed up the sewing (less fidgeting). Also, before pinning the binding, I also cut around the shapes of the tabs. I’d left them uncut because this prevented fraying. I cut them at this point and immediately wrapped the binding around them.

The cut tabs.

Now, tabs are horrendous. Everyone hates them. The only way I could get around them was to settle that I couldn’t make them look pretty. The excess around the corners is just… it’s just gonna stay there. I tried my best to fold it in to try and make it look half decent. But oh well! I think they turned out better, and they’re easier to handle as you go on.

Ugly little tabs.

After the first side was done, I went to the wrong side and whip stitched that down too.

Now, compared to the tabs, the top edge of the corset was a piece of cake! And it also took only a quarter of the time the tabs did.

An example of overlapping the strips of leather.
The top edge included the shoulder straps.

At this point, I did the eyelets. These were handsewn with embroidery thread that matched the boning channels thread. They would’ve been easier to do when the corset wasn’t assembled, but I was afraid it might need some seam adjustments or taken in at the CB, so I left them from last when I was positive they would fit fine.

One day I’ll be able to make even eyelets.

After the eyelets were done, I tried the stays on so that I could arrange the placement of the straps. I pinned them in place and then sewed them together with extra strong thread.

I also hand fell the seams so that they were neater.

And they were done!

Making an Art Nouveau Meg cosplay: the photos

I originally made this costume last year. I’d only worn it to one convention, October MCM London in 2016, but I only got one or two photos on the day! I really love this costume and I loved wearing it, so I was determined to get more photos this year. I also did a few alterations that I think improved the costume. I made a whole new breastplate (the other one was too big and kept slipping down), I embroidered over the lace which I think looks nicer, and took in the skirt.

I’ll link to the Making Of blog posts below.

Art Nouveau Meg: making Worbla armour

Art Nouveau Meg: Construction

Art Nouveau Meg: Details

All of these lovely photos are thanks to the wonderful Lachlan Williams (check out some of his photography here).

I can only do silly poses kay

 

Fabric Haul: July 2017

Every other time I’ve written a fabric haul, I felt like I’d gone somewhere specifically to find awesome fabric. However, since, I’ve instead been going around the London shops whenever I need anything, not really buying more than enough for one project at a time. But now I need to collect quite a few things, so I decided to do a massive London tour and hit both Goldhawk Road and Walthamstow market!

I got everything I needed in the end, and enough for two petticoats, three dresses and a pair of stays. I’m always financially limited so I always go in with a list, a budget, and a compromising mindset. I wish I could buy silk – but for the moment I can’t afford it. This is what I liked about Walthamstow, everything was super cheap! AMAZING.

So onwards.

The most important thing I want to find was fabric for my new cosplay. I plan on making this for October MCM London but I want to do it ASAP because I’m so excited, but finding the fabric was a huge headache. I’m keeping the cosplay itself under wraps (cause I’m afraid it might go wrong and I won’t finish it), but think musicals! Unfortunately I haven’t seen this particular musical myself, so I only had about three photos to work off of. I spent a few weeks stalking everywhere online and getting samples from London fabric shops. None of them were what I wanted.

Most of the options were either too dark, too shiny, or too pink.

I was stuck on the idea of this peach/coral-y taffeta (silk, in my dreams) with a warm sheen/possibly two tone. I couldn’t find anything that was a)like this b)affordable. I found a really good contender that was completely out of budget but it was gorgeous, here but I can only dream of silk. Eventually I settle for this light weight satin that was super cheap somewhere in Walthamstow.

Thinking of the 18th century, I’ve watched so much Poldark over the past few months that I was really itching to make a simple linen 18th century dress. Probably a robe a’Anglaise, I’ve got a book recently about more working and middle class clothes in the 18th century, so I’ll decide after some more research. But I did buy this lovely simple linen in Goldhawk Road! I purchased 5 meters at £5 p/m.

Still with the 18th century in mind, I bought a meter of this ugly quilted thing, but my intentions are to make an ‘ugly puffer’ after American Duchess style. This should help with my 18th century silhouette! This was only £4.50 a meter.

Still for the 18th century, I had just finished drafting my own 1776 stays so I bought one meter of this lovely old Liberty print cotton, at Goldhawk Road, for £8.95.

I also snagged up a scrap of really nice suede brown leather to do the binding. I’ve been meaning to bind with leather forever, since it’s both accurate and aesthetically pleasing, but I found leader really hard to find. Originally I wanted it to match the maroon colour on this fabric, but it was impossible, so I settled for a really nice, warm brown. The scrap should give me approximately nine meters of binding (more than enough) and it was only £10!

And then I found this wonderful, weird… thing. I have no idea what it’s made out of or what it actually is, but it was £2 p/m and I thought it would make a nice petticoat, so I bought 3 meters. For some reason, in my head, this is a great petticoat for Belle’s Yellow Dress but there aren’t any clear screencaps of the undergarments you can see in the film. Either way, it’ll be used for something!

Preeeeetty

And the last one is something I’ve wanted to make for ages now! Ever since I heard about it, I’ve loved the idea of Disneybounding AND Dapper Day. So I’m combining both and making a 1950s Peter Pan inspired dress. I AM SO EXCITED. I love the circle skirts and the rockabilly look, and I love Disney and Peter Pan so I’m just – so excited. The light green is really nice, light cotton which was £4.95 p/m at Goldhawk Road. I bought lining in both colours, a total of four meters, for around £2 p/m for both, at Walthamstow market. I’m not sure what the dark green is, but it had a really nice drape that I thought would be nice for a circle skirt, and it was £4.50 p/m.

For random bits, I bought two meters of cheap ivory organza at £2 p/m so I could make some petticoat ruffles, and a meter of an interesting textured chiffon for my secret cosplay.

And that is it for now! I’ve got enough for three different projects and a few other bits and bobs. Hopefully I’ll be posting about the making of these projects very soon!